Tag Archives: #mystery/thriller

Review of Irma’s Endgame

Irma's EndgameIrma’s Endgame by Paulette Mahurin
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Kept my interest throughout. The back story central to plot is a transplant patient exhibiting personality traits of an organ donor. It’s not unheard of. The author does a good job wrapping up a complicated story involving the donor (briefly) and her spouse, along with the recipient and his spouse. Lots of emotional turmoil between the husband who received the heart transplant and his wife–who has her own history that contributes to the trying times.

There’s much sturm und drang among the rich Beverly Hills set. Some years after the transplant, leading cardiac surgeon Peter Dayton is charged with manslaughter. He allegedly prescribed the wrong meds to another patient. Irma Mullins, attorney who mediates cases, is shocked to see the news about Dayton. She never stopped loving him, despite his spurning her decades ago for someone more acceptable to Dayton’s parents. She reaches out to him and offers her help.

Did Dayton do it? Well, given the set up, the reader has to conclude probably not. So, how will Irma prove it? With lots and lots of research, aided by her investigative journalist friend. Plus, deep dives into the lives of all those folks involved back in the transplant situation–the brokenhearted husband of the heart donor, the recipient and his wife who doesn’t like the changes her husband has after he receives a new heart.

The only complaint in an otherwise excellent story is length and the words spent getting to the end. Might have been able to shave 15% or more words, making for a quicker read. Some of the rich characterization and other details seemed superfluous to the storyline. I felt impatient at times–come on, move it along. On the other hand, they may be just what a screenwriter and producer wants for adapting the book into a feature film. That is, once COVID-19 slows down enough. Don’t be surprised to see it in theaters in a two or three years.

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First Book Reviews for 2020

Two Good Books–Recently Read

The Magus CovenantThe Magus Covenant by Toni Pike
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

If you like Dan Brown (as in The Da Vinci Code) you will like this. I only just got on to this book through reading a review on a blog post. I’m glad I did.

This is the first in the Jotham Fletcher series. He is a rector in an Anglican parish in Australia. His research into Simon Magus leads him to deliver a lecture in Rome. (Could not help but recall the Silver Chalice–where Jack Palance portraying Magus, believes he can fly. I saw it as a child).

Like Brown’s Logdon, Pike’s Fletcher gets embroiled in controversial sectarian elements within the Catholic Church. Unlike Logdon, Fletcher faces much more serious danger personally. So, this story is really stronger in that respect. I have never been a Catholic, so I have no preconceived notions, much less actual knowledge, of the possible intrigues within a 2,000 year old faith. Yet, I find it all very intriguing and perhaps potentially possible, (if somewhat implausible) given human nature.

Pike’s book follows the mystery/thriller precepts of plot/suspense progression well and builds to a climax with heightened tension and twists. If you like the genre, you will like this book–it’s well written.

The Ambassador Calls Twice (The Federation Diplomat Stories)The Ambassador Calls Twice by E.J. Randolph
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

One should always review a book soon after, if not immediately, upon completion. Such has been my spring of brain fog that didn’t happen. After refreshing my recollection, I learned there are TWO books in one Kindle. OK, not really two separate books, but two different stories with all the same cast of characters that E.J. Randolph introduced in the first in this series about Federation Diplomat Kate Stevens.

Somehow I missed this one when it came out and then I learned it won a best eBook award in Arizona/New Mexico. It’s worthy of the award. It’s space opera for the 21st century–updated with hilarious friends and enemies. Vivid imagery of planets, people and more make it eminently readable. The description in the Goodreads summary needs no repeating here–that’s all you need to know. Well, you do need to know there’s no graphic sex or violence, just a well written story with believable but odd characters. Like the crew member who likes to eat meals that combine ingredients that might cause normal folks to upchuck. An AI (that runs the ship) that makes all sorts of interesting observations in discussions with Kate.

You know Kate will survive, but how she does it is still rendered suspensefully.

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