Tag Archives: Buddhism

Herbie Hancock Lectures on Buddhism and Creativity

This is the one you really don’t want to miss. What else can I say. The man has contributed so much to the world and he just keeps on going like the Energizer Bunny–although that is a pale and trivial comparison. Anyway, go here for the video. He will tell you how and why he began his practice of Buddhism and what it has done for him and will do for you too!

Is It Time to Repeal the Second Amendment?

Got your attention? Not happening any time soon. Wayne LaPierre, et al will take care of that. But that was a facetious title. No, this is really about the Ft. Hood shooting. We could all probably write the script for the news: Hand wringing, video of police cars and ambulances, news conferences by applicable authorities and most of all, discussions with analysts or “experts” on what went wrong and what might be done to prevent such incidents in the future. Most of the “solutions” that have been tried are impractical or ineffective. There is really only one, that doesn’t get discussed on air, the web or in print. Continue reading Is It Time to Repeal the Second Amendment?

Herbie Hancock Harvard Lectures on the Ethics of Jazz

Selected as the 2014 Charles Eliot Norton Professor of Poetry, Herbie Hancock will be delivering six lectures at Harvard University on the “Ethics of Jazz.” Two have already been presented and may be viewed on YouTube. Find the first one here and the second here. They are MOST inspiring. A synopsis and more about Herbie’s contributions may be found on the website of the International Committee of Artists for Peace (ICAP). The board members of ICAP include Carlos Santana, Patrick Duffy, Wayne Shorter, Herbie Hancock and five other individuals. You will note that ICAP now is a featured link on the sidebar at left (or bottom if you are viewing this on your cell phone). You should check them out for some really amazing videos and for more information on how art can make an impact on creating a more peaceful world.

Remembering 9/11

I was in my cubicle, in the Fairfax County Government Center, 30 miles from the Pentagon. I was hard at work on the FY 2003 budget for my agency, the Division of Solid Waste, Collection and Recycling. Then came news of the first attack. Only nobody knew it was an attack when the first plane hit. Only after the second came, did that become clear. The director was out of the office so somebody turned on the TV in his office (there for viewing Board of Supervisor meetings, etc., not for soaps). I wandered in and out, while others spent much time in there. Then came news of the other hijacked plane, heading for a destination unknown, but in the DC area. I went back to work; the budget had a deadline and it was my job. Then came the blast at the Pentagon. Right where my wife of nearly 21 years would have been working had she got the promotion she bitterly resented not getting a few Continue reading Remembering 9/11

Waiting for Westmoreland now on iTunes

Shameless self-promotion: you can download Waiting for Westmoreland as an epub now for $8.99. Go here if you have an iPad, etc. with which to view it and are so inclined. If you don’t know about WFW, hit the last item in the links to your right.

Also, belatedly, if you had a comment that was trashed erroneously (i.e., you are not a spammer) try submitting it again and I will review what comes in for integrity. I had to do a lot of bulk deletions to clean up this blog.

Are We Safe Now?

Did TSA really ask a 95-year old wheelchair-bound female leukemia patient to remove her (wet) depends undergarment to make sure she wasn’t carrying a bomb? Do they really pat down small children/toddlers? If so, does that make you feel safer flying? Here’s the deal, Osama Bin Laden, apparently was fixated on airplane terrorism. Two reasons why EVERYONE gets inspected: Continue reading Are We Safe Now?

Iraq, Afghanistan and the American Psyche

For those whose loved ones are there now or who suffer after effects from time they spent in combat, Iraq and Afghanistan remain an immediate concern. For others, like myself, the conflicts are an abstraction. The sufferings of the soldiers and the civilians do not pain my psyche. I have to remind myself again and  again, despite regular news coverage, of the real pain that war causes. Am I alone in that respect? Continue reading Iraq, Afghanistan and the American Psyche

Yes, You Can Write and Publish a Book

Not to steal too much of Barack Obama’s verbage here, but translating we to you or I will fairly adjust his message to the self-empowerment topic that is so popular among writers of a certain type inspirational book. It also correlates well with the self-empowerment that I find through the practice of Buddhism. Regardless of whether you find that religious practice to your liking or you find one or another of the various self-help gurus appealing, the fact is that generically it is will and determination overcoming doubt and procrastination that makes all the difference. A little (OK, a lot) research and persistence are also required. There is a lot to be said about writing and publishing a book; so I will dribble it out a little bit at a time. There is also a lot more to be said about the topic generally–Yes, You Can; so I plan on hitting it some more, with no more apologies to Obama. For now, let me just leave you with a link to building an author platform (now an abandoned book idea) at Morris Rosenthal’s website. Check out his blog as well. You won’t be disappointed.

The Pope is Coming and the Dalai Lama is Pissed

No, the Dalai Lama isn’t mad at the Pope; that was just to grab your attention. The Pope is visiting America–Washington, DC in fact. The Dalai Lama is upset with China at it’s treatment of Tibet. But they do have something in common. They were both chosen by adherents to lead major religions. Continue reading The Pope is Coming and the Dalai Lama is Pissed

Martin Luther King

Forty years ago today, shots rang out in Memphis, killing the Reverend Martin Luther King. I was in Hawaii that day, on R&R from Vietnam. I returned to my unit in Bearcat, the 9th Infantry Division basecamp 25 miles east of Saigon after the riots had spread across America. Things were not much more wonderful there. Tensions between blacks and whites were already high. Continue reading Martin Luther King